Proposed transportation of nuclear waste to the Yucca Mountain repository hearing before the Subcommittee on Railroads of the Committee on Transportation and Infrastructure, House of Representatives, One Hundred Eighth Congress, second session, March 5, 2004 by United States. Congress. House. Committee on Transportation and Infrastructure. Subcommittee on Railroads

Cover of: Proposed transportation of nuclear waste to the Yucca Mountain repository | United States. Congress. House. Committee on Transportation and Infrastructure. Subcommittee on Railroads

Published by U.S. G.P.O., For sale by the Supt. of Docs., U.S. G.P.O. in Washington .

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Subjects:

  • Radioactive waste disposal in the ground -- Nevada -- Yucca Mountain,
  • Radioactive wastes -- Transportation -- Nevada -- Yucca Mountain,
  • Radioactive waste repositories -- Nevada -- Yucca Mountain

Book details

The Physical Object
Paginationv, 150 p. :
Number of Pages150
ID Numbers
Open LibraryOL15569735M
ISBN 100160745012
OCLC/WorldCa58961691

Download Proposed transportation of nuclear waste to the Yucca Mountain repository

Developing and implementing the transportation system required to transport spent nuclear fuel (SNF) and high-level radioactive waste (HLW) from where the material is generated or stored to the proposed repository at Yucca Mountain, Nevada.

The Plan describes how DOE’s Office of. Sinceunder the Nuclear Waste Policy Act ofas amended (42 U.S.C.

et seq.), the U.S. Department of Energy (the Department) has been investigating a site at Yucca Mountain, Nevada, to determine whether it is suitable for development as the nation's first repository for permanent geologic disposal of spent nuclear fuel and high. Walker explores the evolution of how the government has tried to deal with this issue from the time of the Manhattan Project in World War II through the designation in of Yucca Mountain in Nevada as a waste by: of the proposed repository, but rather extend to the transportation of nuclear waste to the repository.

The two are closely interdependent. Without the repository, waste would not be transported to Yucca Mountain. Without transportation of waste to it, construction of the repository would be irrational. Under NEPA, both must be considered.

Federal lawmakers made their way to Nevada to visit the proposed Yucca Mountain nuclear waste repository near Mercury. A tour led by U.S. Department of Energy officials was held on July 14 for a dozen congressmen, who all support making the Yucca Mountain site the nation’s nuclear waste Author: Jeffrey Meehan.

Department of Energy’s (DOE) site characterization activities at Yucca Mountain, report on potential impacts from the transportation of nuclear waste to Yucca Mountain, and monitor impacts of actual operation of a proposed repository at Yucca Mountain.

The proposed Yucca Mountain site is in the Southern Great Basin approximately miles. The transport of spent nuclear fuel (SNF) and high-level radioactive wastes (HLW) to the proposed Yucca Mountain repository site in Southern Nevada has. Proponents of the Yucca Mountain nuclear waste repository point out that there are no confirmed fatalities from waste transportation and thousands of people who die each year in coal mines, but that is a false equivalency.

When something disastrous occurs, then it causes exposure issues. Spent nuclear fuel and high-level radioactive wastes make up most of the material proposed for disposal in the Yucca Mountain repository.

Approximately 90 percent of the material proposed to be disposed in the repository will be commercial spent nuclear fuel and approximately 10 percent will be high-level radioactive waste from defense programs. A top Yucca Mountain foe warned Las Vegas business leaders Monday that the proposed nuclear waste repository would turn Southern Nevada into a transportation hub for highly radioactive material.

Proposed transportation of nuclear waste to the Yucca Mountain repository: hearing before the Subcommittee on Railroads of the Committee on Transportation and Infrastructure, House of Representatives, One Hundred Eighth Congress, second session, March 5, The Yucca Mountain Nuclear Waste Repository, as designated by the Nuclear Waste Policy Act amendments ofis a proposed deep geological repository storage facility within Yucca Mountain for spent nuclear fuel and other high-level radioactive waste in the United States.

The site is located on federal land adjacent to the Nevada Test Site in Nye County, Nevada, about 80 mi ( km. Highlights Review of the Transportation, Aging, and Disposal (TAD) waste canister system. TAD designed for storage of spent nuclear fuel at the proposed Yucca Mountain repository.

Identification of technical and licensing requirements of the TAD. Challenges that must be addressed before TAD can be successfully implemented. U.S. Nuclear Waste policy dilemma adds to the uncertainty of the Yucca Cited by: 1. The State of Nevada has suggested a dry storage alternative to a nuclear waste repository at Yucca Mountain.

The Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) has determined that spent nuclear fuel can safely be stored at nuclear reactor sites in robust dry storage casks for at least the next years. During the next months, the U.S. Congress will decide the fate of the proposed nuclear waste repository at Yucca Mountain.

Despite nearly two decades of study and site characterization, many. The Yucca Mountain site is located in Nye County in southern Nevada, ∼ km ( mi) northwest of Las Vegas. The entire proposed repository is located on Federal lands, a principal consideration in facilitating further study.

Janu — Nevadans criticize plan to ship waste: Yucca draft lacks details, officials say —The Department of Energy's plan for hauling nuclear waste across the nation to a proposed repository at Yucca Mountain is a brush job at best, Nevada officials who are reviewing the document said this week.

“ It's really a sad indictment of what little has been accomplished. A Bechtel-led team studied Yucca Mountain as the site for the United States' first national nuclear waste repository—where spent-fuel rods from nuclear power plants and solidified high-level radioactive waste from nuclear defense activities could be stored permanently.

Ap — Eureka County Comments on the OCRWM National Transportation Plan, Revision 0 [7 Pages] Janu — Comment Letter, Eureka County: Notice of Revised Proposed Policy and Request for comments, Octo (73 FR ) - (c) implementation— Eureka County Janu — State of Nevada Comments — DOE's Notice of Revised Proposed Policy and.

Geologic Repository for the Disposal of Spent Nuclear Fuel and High-Level Radioactive Waste at Yucca Mountain, Nye County, Nevada. The Proposed Action addressed in this Final EIS is to construct, operate and monitor, and eventually close a geologic repository at Yucca Mountain in southern Nevada for the disposal of spent nuclear fuel and high-level radioactive waste currently in storage or.

Transport of Nuclear Waste Locating the geologically perfect resting place for nuclear waste has been a painstaking ordeal that was met with much opposition.

Yucca Mountain, 80 miles northwest of Las Vegas, Nevada, has been studied and determined by the Department of Energy (DOE) to meet the geological requirements of a high-level waste repository. The rail corridor was one of five potential rail routes consider by the U.S.

Department of Energy (DOE) to shipp High Level Waste to Yucca Mountain, Nevada; Yucca Mountain Tour — This page contains photos of the Eureka County Commissioners' tour of Yucca Mountain. The delegation from Eureka County visited the site of the proposed nuclear waste repository in May of of the Proposed Yucca Mountain High-Level Nuclear Waste Repository Program conclusion to be drawn from this report, it is that the reality of Yucca Mountain is one of massive, pervasive, unavoidable, and unmitigable impacts to Nevada and the nation.

This conclusion leads to another important fact that provides context for the report. Sincethe government has spent almost $15 billion assessing Yucca Mountain as a place to store waste in the ground, collecting $ billion of that from electric bills, the Government Author: Reuters Editorial.

The Nuclear Regulatory Commission notified the public that the NRC staff will prepare a supplement to the Department of Energy's environmental impact statement on the proposed geologic repository for spent nuclear fuel and high-level radioactive waste at Yucca Mountain in Nevada.

Today the future of the Yucca Mountain Repository is still very much in doubt. On FebruSecretary of Energy Spencer Abraham recommended the approval of the Yucca Mountain Repository to President George W.

Bush, who acted the next day to notify Congress of his intention to. The Yucca Mountain Nuclear Waste Repository, as designated by the Nuclear Waste Policy Act amendments ofis to be a deep geological repository storage facility within Yucca Mountain for spent nuclear fuel and other high-level radioactive waste in the United States.

The site is located on federal land adjacent to the Nevada Test Site in Nye County, Nevada, about 80 mi ( km) northwest. The U.S. government has set aside an area of the Western Shoshone Nation, Yucca Mountain, as a final repository for high level nuclear waste from the U.S.

nuclear industry. At present, the Department of Energy (DOE) is conducting a scientific investigation of the site that will cost $63 billion and will allow for the repository to be opened by. Nuclear waste.

Radiation from nuclear waste proposed for Yucca Mountain burial is so intense that anyone with direct contact would receive a fatal dose instantly. Spent nuclear fuel contains tons of plutonium, an extremely toxic byproduct with a half-life of 24, years.

One-billionth of an ounce, if ingested, can cause cancer or genetic defects. TRANSPORTATION: Transporting waste to Yucca Mountain puts the American public at risk. More than million people live near the proposed truck and train routes which would be used to deliver waste to Yucca Mountain.

Those routes travel through counties in 44 states. An accident or attack along those routes could hurt or kill thousands of.

The Nuclear Regulatory Commission received an application from the Department of Energy on June 3,for a license to construct the nation's first geologic repository for high-level nuclear waste at Yucca Mountain, Nevada.

The NRC's role is to assess whether the proposed facility meets NRC's regulatory requirements. People walk into the south portal of Yucca Mountain during a congressional tour of the proposed radioactive waste dump near Mercury, Nev., 90 miles northwest of Las Vegas in April Congress designated Yucca Mountain in to be the eventual home for all U.S.

high-level nuclear waste, and inPresident George W. Bush approved a measure for the Energy Department to. Proposed standards for a Yucca Mountain repository have been sent to the White House Office of Management and Budget (OMB) for interagency review.

Department of Energy (DOE) Responsible for characterizing Yucca Mountain site and determining its suitability as a geologic nuclear waste repository. The state of Nevada still strongly opposes Yucca Mountain and hasn’t changed its tune since passage of the Nuclear Waste Policy Act Amendments in (colloquially known in Nevada as the Screw Nevada Bill), which designated Yucca Mountain as the proposed repository site.

The Department of Energy (DOE) had previously evaluated possible rail routes for hauling high-level nuclear waste to the proposed repository before the project was defunded in Originally the Chalk Mountain route would have run right through the Air Force.

Nuclear waste is a product of the nuclear power plants and even though we would love not to have it, we still have to deal with it. It can’t just stand in the middle of the streets with us because it wouldn’t be healthy for our population and as such, Yucca Mountain as been proposed as a potential site to bury the nuclear waste.

PERFORMANCE OF THE PROPOSED REPOSITORY FOR HIGH-LEVEL NUCLEAR WASTE AT YUCCA MOUNTAIN, NV By Leah Spradley Dissertation Submitted to the Faculty of the Graduate School of Vanderbilt University in partial fulfillment of the requirements for the degree of DOCTOR OF PHILOSOPHY In Interdisciplinary Studies: Environmental Management May, Location, timing, and volumes of post-Miocene volcanic activity, along with expert judgment, provide the basis for assessing the probability of future volcanism intersecting a proposed repository for nuclear waste at Yucca Mountain, Nevada.

Yucca Mountain Repository is the proposed U.S. Department of Energy deep geological repository storage facility for spent nuclear reactor fuel and other radioactive repository is located in a desert on federal land adjacent to the Nevada Test Site in Nye County, Nevada, within Yucca Mountain, a ridge line in the south-central part of the U.S.

state of Nevada. A look at the attempt to establish Yucca Mountain in Nevada as a site for a nuclear waste repository. Yucca Mountain is located approximately 90 miles northwest of Las Vegas.The Department of Energy’s plan for hauling nuclear waste across the nation to a proposed repository at Yucca Mountain is a brush job at best, Nevada officials who are reviewing the document.The money that is being spent on Yucca Mountain could only be spent on Yucca or a similar repository, as per the Nuclear Waste Policy Act.

This money comes from a surcharge of cents/kW-hr added to the bills of anyone using nuclear power.

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